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-- host: welcome to "washington journal." of the senate host: an increase in payroll taxes and the scheduled spending cuts across the board. a couple republicans yesterday signaled they could be flexible on the anti-tax pledge that they signed if it gets them closer to a deal with the white house. what is your reaction? here are the numbers to call. you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join us on facebook. you can also e-mail us. here's "usa today" looking at what happened on the sunday talk shows. it says -- the south carolina senator became the second republican senator in recent days to back away from a no tax pledge devised in the decades ago. the willingness to break ranks could prove crucial as gop leaders and democrats try to reach a deal before taxing and spending changes take effect in january. new york representative king says economic conditions have changed since the anti-tax pledge first emerged. he's a republican. that thee gop's say fiscal cliff deal is what defined grover norquist. let's hear congressman pete king of new york, a republican. he was
norquist's anti-tax pledge. saying they're open to letting revenues rise if democrats do their part in the budget talks. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece, and republicans should put revenue on the table. i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the declaration of war against japan. we're not going to attack japan today. the world has changed, and the economic situation is different. >> so peter king is telling us, mike barnicle, not only is he going soft on taxes, he's going soft on japan. >> i know. >> it's not just peter king on the taxes. it's a big step, don't you think? >> it's a big step. >> grover. yeah, grover's taking a big hit since the election. there's no doubt about it. i think john, you'd verify this. number of republicans, i've talked to a couple of united states senators who
-profile republicans that says he will break the longstanding pledge regarding taxes and says he will do it for the country, but only if democrats are willing to make reforms on entitledment programs, medicare and medicaid and social security. that is big if. good morning, hope your turkey was great. martha: good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum. you've got this. congressman peter king and now senator bob corker say they will ignore the decades old pledge that was signed by 241 house members and senators. he says he believes it is a huge game-changer. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt the only pledge we should make to each other is to avoid becoming greece. republicans should put revenue on the table. we're this far in debt. we don't generate enough revenue. capping deductions will help generate revenue. raising tack rates will hurt job creation. bill: this is the heart of the matter. stuart varney, host of "varney & company". morning to you, sir? >> this is a real shift. one of the two sides had some movement in their position on the tax side of the debate. that side is the re
bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxes ride. chambliss spoke to his hometown station. >> that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly. and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> on sunday south carolina senator lindsey graham also broke ranks saying the norquist pledge can no longer be a conservative litmus test. >> when you're $16 trillion in it debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece. but i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if it democrats will do entitlement reform. >> b
sure raising taxes on the wealthy is part of the deal. politico is calling them cliff jumpers. l good morning to both of you. >> good morning. >> let me play a couple of clips to start out about the pledge. >> i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you sign 20 years ago, 18 years ago, is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1841 i would have supported declaration of war against japan. i won't attack japan today. the world changed and the economic situation is different. >> i am not oblg gate on the pledge. i was just elected. the only thing i am honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i am sworn in in january. >> chambliss already made a similar statement last week. the question is is this a real softening of positions? does it give them room to make deal. >> two things. first, let's look at the real room being created. so far i haven't heard anyone say i am willing to raise marginal tax rates as part of a deal. they're arguing with the head of the antitax coalition about whet
putting limits on their no tax pledge and telling grover norquist to get lost. but remember, there's only one of those people in the houpts. >>> keeping home and change alive. president obama's aits are hoping to keep the campaign going and use their new leverage at the polls to bin the fight for higher taxes against the wealthy. >>> this is "hardball," the place for politics. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> get ready for some more partisan agendas in the state governments across the country. that's because some january at least 37 states will be under single party control. 37 of them. with one party holding both houses of state legislatures and the governorship. and that's the largest number of states under single part
grover norquist, condemning his pledge never to raise taxes. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece and republicans should put revenue on the table. >> how's that for a profiling courage? senator graham is standing up to a pledge he made to an unelected official in charge of a group that most americans never heard of. a pledge that's 26 years old. but at least graham is voting to raise taxes on the wealthy. right? wrong. >> raises tax rates will hurt job creation so i agree with grover we should not raise rates. i will violate for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> so he won't raise tax rates and entitlements need to be gutted. but that's more like it. let's see some more brave talk from the gop. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. there's a menu of options on the revenue side and on the entitlement side and as long as there are two parties that are willing to solve this problem, this is a very easy thing to do technically. what it takes is political courage. >> guess
small business tax hikes. got to love that one. meantime democrats continue to announce tax hikes. tomorrow senator dick durbin will bill what's major address to lay out the progressive case for a bipartisan deal and later this week the second white house meeting with meetings from both sides of the aisle. joining us is our post tag team bill russert and bloomberg's stephanie ruhle. she rules. unwrap that for us, brother. >> well, they would say the good news is that there has been some movement from senate republicans on the issue of raising taxes. lindsey graham, saxby chambless talking about a tax revenue. medicare, medicaid, perhaps we could have some meaningful entitlement reform. that's the good news, that there seems to be this idea that we can work out a big partisan deal. we both know taxes going up. entitlement, benefits going down. however, when we get into the bad news is that while this is all fine and dandy coming out of the cincinnati, toure. the real negotiations are going to happen between president obama and house speaker john boehner. it's a lot different animal
educated population. so you've got these city leaders who realize that their economy, their tax base is eroding with every kid that drops out. and that's why you see the mayor emanuels standing up and saying, we can't -- and just think about it. if he allowed the same contract to go in place, does anyone realistically think it would change the 40% dropout rate? no. at some point you've got to change it. yes, over here. oh, i'm sorry. yes. >> you talked about foreign competition in china, india, those places kind of getting ahead of us. is the model that we have in place for teaching our kids that was built in the agricultural age really sufficient for the information age? is the curriculum we have in place sufficient to allow them to be inknowers and entrepreneurs? >> now, that's a softball question. [laughter] no, but realistically, you know, i'm trying not to jump out of my shoes on that. look, no. i mean, when we built this educational system, the '93 model, you know, we ended it artificially because of the compromise with farmers so kids could get out of school in enough time to
not reach a deal your taxes could rise and sharp spending cuts would go into effect as well possibly triggering a recession. chuck todd is nbc's political director and chief white house correspondent. chuck, good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. >> the goal here is to get a deal that reduces the deficit, and the battle lines have been pretty clear right now. the president campaigned rolling back the tax breaks for the highest earnings and republicans argued spending cuts are the way to get the deficit under control. are we starting to see a softening of those positions on both sides? >> reporter: here's what there's agreement on. both sides, both parties agree that the wealthiest have to pay more, and the question now and the sticking point at this stage is how do you go about making the wealthiest pay more? do you do it by raising the tax rates? that's what president obama wants to do. wants to raise the tax freights 35% where they are now up to where they were during the clinton years at 39% what. republicans are arguing is you don't have to do that. you can get all of th
-up demand. can we tell yet? >> one thing i'm worried about is the fiscal cliff issue, the tax increases and spending cuts that take place january 1 unless congress and the president reach a deal. businesses have been worried about that for months. maybe consumers are start-- maybe it's starting to creep into their thinking as well. we saw a weaker consumer sentiment number last week. that's thing to watch to worry about as we wonder what the holiday season will be like. >> brown: nariman behravesh, is it strange or do things really change? on the one hand, we want people to get out and spend, but on the other hand, we still talk about over-spending and spending money people didn't really have was part of the problem that got us into this state in the first place. so what's-- that sounds like a little bit of a disconnect. where are we on that? >> well, i think neil is right in saying consumer finances are in much better shape right now. so in that sense, the kind of spending we're seeing now is more sustainable. it's healthier in a sense. debt levels are down. people are not taking, say,
situations began after the revolutionary war and congress had no power to tax or raise troops and was a debating society for leaders in the various states to argue different policies through the streets were almost at war with each other, independent, sovereign nations in effect, and the leaders from various states began to realize we need a stronger federal government and so they wrote the constitution. and many americans were opposed in the constitution and they became antifederalists so they were the federal lists and antifederalists bitterly opposed to each other from the very beginning from the signing of the constitution. the antifederalists gradually became known as the republicans and then democrat republicans. so that when john quincy adams was running for office you now have the democrat republicans running against the federalists and he was the last of the federalists. they ran this country from the beginning. washington, adams, he had a they were the people that ran the country had come they were really from the elite. the constitutional elite and the state-owned p
and budget in the white house the duck stamp tax -- duck stamp is a tax. it simply is a tax. people can say it's not a tax. it's a tax. they have defined it as a tax. we don't have the ability to redefine the meaning of words around here. and it's a tax and a tax can't originate in the senate. so the house as it's presently written, is likely to object and will object to this, i'm certain. another easily fixed problem in the bill is this: the environment and public works committee brought the legislation up. the question of whether the duck stamp tax should be set by law by congress or given to the member of the present staff to set at whatever level he wants was discussed. and senator boxer agreed with those who shared the view that we shouldn't be delegating the power to an unelected cabinet person to set taxes in the united states of america. you can set duck stamp under this bill at any level he wants to set it at. that's not good. this is constitutional. i really feel strongly about it. congress must never cede its power to tax to a single person not even accountable or any other entit
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13